This is a page for questions.

  1. What is the GradShow
  2. Am I eligible to participate?
  3. What do I need to do to enter?
  4. What does a Visual/Performing Arts proposal submission look like?
  5. What does a Research, Scholarship, and Entrepreneurship proposal submission look like?
  6. What does a scholarly poster look like?
  7. What if I have never made a scholarly poster in my discipline before?
  8. What are the dimensions for the posters?
  9. What are the main awards?
  10. What other awards are there?
  11. How does the judging work?
  12. Who are the judges?
  13. What are the judges looking for?
  14. What is a 3 minute talk?
  15. Where can I view my submission?
  16. Will I receive feedback or my score?
  17. Can I give an oral presentation of my Research, Scholarship, and Entrepreneurship work?
  18. Will there be electric outlets for my work?
  19. What materials are provided for my work?
  20. Is there a limit to how many submissions I can enter?
  21. What if I have class during the times of the GradShow?
  22. Who can I direct questions to?

What is the GradShow?

The GradShow is a one day graduate conference at CSU that provides an opportunity for you as a graduate student to showcase your talents, connect with other graduate students, and enjoy the possibility of winning a cash award.

Am I eligible to participate?

If you are a graduate student at CSU, you are eligible to participate! We also welcome students who plan to graduate this Fall to participate. We encourage submissions that encompass all areas.

What do I need to do to enter?

Follow the directions on the website to submit your proposal. You will need to identify if your work is research-based or creative work. We suggest you use the Visual/Performing Arts or the Research/Scholarship/Entrepreneurship template to assist you with preparing the required proposal information prior to completing the form online. Please e-mail the administrators if you have any questions.

What does a Visual/Performing Arts proposal submission look like?

A project submission for Visual/Performing Arts includes the following: Project Summary: consists of (1) background information about your work/course of study (e.g., explanation or description of your work and what it represents), (2) significance and impact of work (e.g., what your work means to you and your field of study), and (3) future direction (e.g., where might you go from here based on your current project). Note: The limit for this project summary is 200 words for the first 2 sections and 100 words for the final section. Abstract: An abstract is an even briefer summary (limit 100 words) of your project. Hint: It usually consists of several sentences related to each of the above mentioned areas (e.g., background information, significance of work, and future direction).

What does a Research, Scholarship, and Entrepreneurship proposal submission look like?

A project submission for Research, Scholarship, and Entrepreneurship includes the following: Project Summary: This is a summary of your project or entrepreneurial business pitch and should include descriptions of the purpose of the project (e.g., why it’s important, how it fits in the current literature, etc.), procedure/description (e.g, what did you do, what was the process of your project), results/outcomes (e.g., what happened, what did you discover or learn through your project), and implications/future directions (e.g., how does your project impact your field of study, what are something’s that future researchers or scholars could look at as based on your project). The project summary for an entrepreneurship submission summarizes a business plan in relation to purpose of the project (e.g., business concept, what problem does the business solve for customers, description of product), procedure/description (e.g., market strategy, development, sales & marketing, operations, financing), results/outcomes (e.g., major achievements, prototypes, patents, facility) and implications/future (e.g., return on investment, expansion plans, exit strategy). Note: The limit for a project summary is 500 words. Abstract: An abstract is an even briefer summary (limit 100 words) of your project. Hint: It usually consists of a sentence or two related to each of the above mentioned areas (e.g., the purpose of the project, procedure/description, results/outcomes, implications/future directions) or for entrepreneurship submissions this may be similar to a shortened version of the executive summary).

What does a scholarly poster look like?

First time making a poster? Need help getting started on a poster? Need a refresher course? No problem! The NYU Library website provides information about how to make and present a poster, including templates and design recommendations. Here’s some other important information specifically about making posters for the Grad Show: (1) Although the above link discusses research posters, the GradShow will incorporate posters that cover a variety of topics (e.g., theory, project proposals) and areas of expertise. Any student in any area of study can submit to present a poster! (2) What needs to be included on the poster? We ask that you include Purpose, Procedure/Description, Results/Outcome, and Implications/Future Directions to the best of your ability. (3) Printing a poster can happen ON CAMPUS in the Morgan Library! Instructions on how to print a poster at the Morgan Library are available on the CSU Library website. (4) Consultation services may be available if you are still having difficulty designing a poster in your respective discipline. Check out the awards page for information about the general awards and see last year’s winners! Please e-mail GradShow@colostate.edu if you have other questions or need additional help.

What if I have never made a scholarly poster in my discipline before?

No problem! Please contact Maeve O’Donnell and Kirsten Graham at GradShow@colostate.edu. If there is enough interest within your department, they can host workshops and/or consultation services!

What are the dimensions for the posters?

The dimensions for the posters are either 3’x4’ or 4’x3’ (the provided frames will accommodate both sizes). PLEASE BE SURE THAT YOUR POSTER ADHERES TO THESE DIMENSIONS!

What are the main awards?

All submitted research proposals and creative work will automatically be considered for awards in the general two areas of "Great Minds in Research" and "Distinction in Creativity." In addition, there will be awards for submissions in areas such as global impact and engineering. Many of the academic colleges are also sponsoring awards for their students. More than $10,000 will be given as awards.

When you sign up to participate, you will be asked if your proposal meets the criteria for several of the award(s), such as Global Impact. As noted above, all proposals will be considered for the general awards. These awards are based on your discipline so there is no need to indicate interest in being considered - you will be automatically entered for the general awards as well as your own college awards. Check out the awards page for information about the general awards and see last year’s winners!

What are the other awards?

When you sign up to participate, you will be asked if your proposal meets the criteria for several of the Global Impact Awards offered by the Office of International Programs. In addition, you may be considered for other awards based on the applicability of your work to each area of interest. Each awarding group sets the eligibility and judging criteria for their awards.

There are also many college-specific awards. You will be automatically entered for your own college awards. Judging criteria varying according to the college. Check out the awards page for information about the general awards and see last year’s winners!

How does the judging work?

To be eligible for judging on the day of the GradShow, you must check in your submission prior to 9:30 A.M. Your accepted proposal for the GradShow will have been randomly assigned to either the "Green" or the "Gold" group. Those assigned to the Green group will be expected to be at their poster from 9:30 A.M. to 11:30 A.M.; the Gold group must be present by their poster from 10:30 A.M. to 12:30 P.M. Judges are aware that these are the times you will be by your submission.

Because all submissions are eligible for either the "Distinction in Creativity" or "Great Minds in Research" you will have at least two judges stop by, and possibly more. This is because there are a number of different groups of judging. For example, some awards such as the award sponsored by CSU Ventures bring in additional judges for their award. The final number of judges that stop by will ultimately depend on your eligibility for the various awards. Everyone will be rated by a minimum of two judges.

Remember, judges are not required to identify themselves, so they may not always inform you that they are a judge.

Who are the judges?

Judges will consist of faculty members, post-doctoral fellows, staff, alumni and community members. As a reminder, judges are assigned randomly, so you can expect that your judges most likely are not individuals from your own field.

What are the judges looking for?

The judges have a Scoring Rubric that considers the following categories: Background/Introduction, Purpose, Design, Results/Outcomes, Conclusions, Impact, Poster Appearance/Layout, and Overall Impression.

In addition, this year the criteria for judging a project will include how well you can explain your submission to the judges. Given it is likely these individuals are outside your field of study, you will need to prepare a 3 minute talk that explains your project to a lay audience.

What is a 3 minute talk?

A compelling oration where you consolidate your ideas and crystalize the important aspects of your submission for a lay audience. Make sure to include the significance of your work. Because your 3 minute talk is targeted for people outside your field, be careful about the professional jargon you use. Make sure to have appropriate language for everyone, and when needed, explain terminology that you include.

Overall, you want to make sure that what you say is comprehensive with rich content about your project. Present with an engaging manner, making it interesting for the other person.

You can see examples of 3 minute talks from CSU's VPR Fellowship Cohort awardees and the 3MT Showcase. You might note that these examples are from 3 minute competitions across the world. Although our format is a bit different, they still provide a good overview of how you might approach putting together you 3 minute explanation of your project for the GradShow.

Where can I view my submission?

If you want to view your submission you can log back to the GradShow submission page.

Will I know my score or be able to receive feedback?

No, unfortunately we are not able to provide individual feedback from the judges. Although we know that graduate students are often interested, and even focused on what they could do to improve, the judging for the GradShow is only for the purpose of identifying award winners. We encourage you to meet with your advisor, committee members, and/or other faculty members in your program to get their feedback on your project. They are really the experts on how to improve your scholarship.

Can I give an oral presentation of my Research, Scholarship, and Entrepreneurship work?

No. A 3 minute talk regarding your poster presentation is required; however, there will be no talks or oral presentations in lieu of a poster presentation during the iteration of the GradShow. All Research, Scholarship, and Entrepreneurship submissions must be presented in a poster format.

Will there be electric outlets for my work?

No electrical outlets will be available in the space provided.

What materials are provided for my work?

The materials vary based on the type of submission.

For Research, Scholarship, and Entrepreneurship submissions, there will be space to hang your research poster. Handouts are encouraged, but optional.

For Visual Art, your footprint for displaying your work will be 4 feet wide by 2 feet deep with a table provided upon your request. Other supplies, such as easels or pedestals will not be supplied by the GradShow, but they are available if you contact the art department and arrange bringing the materials on your own. Due to CSU regulations, you will not be permitted to hang anything from the ceiling. Please contact us with any concerns: GradShow@colostate.edu.

For Performing Art submissions, the GradShow will provide a stage, podium, and microphone. A piano will also be available for your use. All other materials you should arrange to bring on your own. Please contact us with any concerns: GradShow@colostate.edu.

Is there a limit to how many submissions I can enter?

Yes, we ask that you submit one first-author entry per person.

What if I have class during the times of the GradShow?

The expectation is that you will be at the GradShow from 9:00 A.M. - 12:30 P.M. We encourage you to contact your professor and let them know that you are participating in this campus-wide graduate student conference. In past semesters, some professors have excused students from class or even cancelled class to attend the showcase themselves. You will need to discuss this directly with your professor in order to determine what is feasible.

Who can I direct questions to?

Please direct questions to Maeve O’Donnell and Kirsten Graham at GradShow@colostate.edu.